The Txt Book -The best texting games


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Has conversation gone stale? Why not try a fun and exciting texting game to get it flowing again? Whether you’re nostalgic for the simple games of your childhood, or you’re just bored, we have an exhaustive list of awesome texting games to play with your friends, family, or acquaintances.

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From classics like Hangman or Would You Rather to wacky games like Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon, we’ll take a look at the most exciting and fun texting games you can play right now.

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Trivia

How much do you know about, well, just about anything? You’ll find that out both about yourself and your friends by playing Trivia, a familiar concept derived from game shows and board games that tests your knowledge of detail and reveals how educated you really are — or not. As an esteemed history teacher once told us: There are things an educated person just knows. So with Trivia, you and your companion pick a topic and take turns asking questions about that topic. The first person to answer 10 right wins. And hey, no googling.

Example: What was the name of King Lear’s youngest daughter? Answer: Cordelia

Fortunately, Unfortunately

Fortunately, Unfortunately is a simple, fun, improvisational game with few rules and limitless possibilities. Players take turns telling a story, alternating between fortunate and unfortunate statements. As with Exquisite corpse or other such improv games, Fortunately, Unfortunately forces players to be creative while still working within the framework that has been passed to them. It works best with an odd number of players so that people get to do both fortunate and unfortunate statements.

Example: In a three-player game, Player 1 starts the story, saying “Jeff woke up, showered, got dressed, and left to catch the bus to work, as he does every day.” Player 2 then says, “Unfortunately, the bus’s engine broke down right as it got to Jeff’s stop.” Player 3 then says “Fortunately, there was an unchained bike nearby that Jeff stole for the day.” Player 1 continues with an “unfortunate” statement, and the cycle continues.

20 Questions

Twenty Questions was a 19th-century, spoken parlor game well before the radio and television show hit American airwaves decades later. It’s a classic game of deductive reasoning and quick-hit creativity, requiring no more than two people and as little or as much time as the players set. The premise is simple: One person chooses an object or person while the other attempts to guess it in 20 questions or less. Once the subject is chosen, the opposite player sends a series of questions via text, ideally narrowing down the subject through the corresponding yes-or-no answers.

Example: Say you’ve chosen Morgan Freeman as your subject. The player opposite you may ask, “Are you an animal?” You would respond negatively and they would move on to another question, such as “Are you a human being?” Considering you’re Morgan Freeman, you would reply with “yes.” The game continues in a similar manner until the player guesses the correct answer or surpasses 20 questions, whichever comes first. Morgan Freeman is far too easy. Pick something harder.

Would You Rather

Would You Rather may not be a game built on the moral and ethical quandaries we’re forced to face on a day-to-day basis — at least I hope not — but it will certainly reveal the nature of your character. The basic premise is this: One person asks “would you rather …” followed by two differing hypothetical scenarios. The options can be as interrelated or as distant as you want them to be, but the two scenarios should carry equal weight if possible. Try to be creative in your questioning and avoid clarifying questions. Also, remember the best questions are the ones usually depicting two uncomfortable and equally terrible scenarios.

Examples: The WYR possibilities are virtually endless, allowing users to make the game as simple or harrowing as they want it to be. We’ve presented a few potential conundrums below, but Redditors have taken the game to an entirely new level. Pssh, and I thought I was creative.

“Would you rather fight a hundred duck-sized horses or one horse-sized duck?” (Here’s the right answer.)

“Would you rather talk like Jar Jar Binks, or look like Jar Jar Binks?”

“Would you rather change gender every time you sneeze, or not be able to tell the difference between a muffin and a baby?”

Never Have I Ever

Never Have I Ever, sometimes known as 10 Fingers, is that borderline inappropriate game you drunkenly played in the hot tub once with your prospective boyfriend or girlfriend. It usually involves several players and drinking copious amounts of alcohol, but you can just as easily play it sober with two people via text. Begin by setting a specific number of lives, often represented by fingers when played in person, and any other additional rules you’d like to include. Players then take turns making statements of things they’ve never done before, hence the title of the game. The opposite player loses a point whenever a statement is made that contradicts his or her own experiences.

Though uncommon, some rules specify the person who loses a point must provide a detailed account of why he or she is doing so. According to one American college student quoted on Wikipedia, NHIE and similar games “reveal interesting things about the participants and help build friendships.” The attribution is questionable, but the game does often reveal deep-seated secrets about your friends that you may, or may not, want to know. Somehow, I’ve found the game always manages to have an overly sexual tone, but I’d advise you against taking gender-oriented cheap shots. A guy shouldn’t lose a point just because he’s kissed a girl — just saying.

Example: Assuming it’s your turn, you might say: “Never have I ever been skinny-dipping.” If the person opposite you has gone skinny-dipping, they would lose a point and then proceed in making a statement of his or her own. The game continues in a similar fashion until one player loses all of his or her points.

Name Game

The Name Game is rather tedious in the long run, but I’ll be darned if it’s not one of the biggest time-wasters of all time. Played in elementary school classrooms and road-tripping minivans across the United States, it’s a simple spelling game derived from words on a particular topic. Players choose a topic, such as famous actors and actresses, and then select which player will go first. Once chosen, the first player chooses and says a word. Following suit, the second player says a word that begins with the last letter of the opposite player’s previous word. The game can carry on indefinitely depending on player knowledge, so it’s often best to set a few ground rules prior to initiating the game. We suggest setting a specific time limit in which players can respond or narrowing the chosen topic to make the game difficult.

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